Episode 33 – Globalization

THE LAST KEY CONCEPTS!

6.1.I.A – new modes of communication – including the Internet, radio communication, and cellular communication – and transportation reduced the problem of geographic distance.

6.1.I.C – Medical innovations, such as vaccines and antibiotics, increased the ability of humans to survive and live longer lives.

6.1.I.D – Energy technologies, including the use of petroleum and nuclear power, raised productivity and increased the production of material goods.

6.1.II.A – As human activity contributed to deforestation, desertification, and increased consumption of the world’s supply of fresh water and clean air, humans competed over these and other resources more intensely than ever before.

6.1.II.B – The release of greenhouse gases and other pollutants into the atmosphere contributed to debates about the nature and causes of climate change.

6.1.III.A – Diseases associated with poverty persisted, while other diseases emerged as new epidemics and threats to human survival. In addition, increased longevity led to a high incidence of certain diseases. (Poverty – Malaria, Cholera) (Epidemics – Ebola, HIV) (Changing lifestyles – Diabetes, Heart disease, Alzheimer’s)

6.1.III.B – More effective forms of birth control gave women greater control over fertility and transformed sexual practices.

6.2.IV.E – Expansions in US military spending and technological development, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and economic weakness in communist countries led to the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

6.2.V.D – Some movements used violence against civilians to achieve political aims (Al-Qaeda)

6.3.II.B – Changing economic institutions and regional trade agreements reflected the spread of principles and practices associated with free-market economics throughout the world.

6.3.II.C – Movements throughout the world protested the inequality of the environmental and economic consequences of global integration. (Greenpeace, Earth Day)

6.3.III – People conceptualized society and culture in new ways; rights-based discourses challenged old assumptions about race, class, gender, and religion. In much of the world, access to education, as well as participation in new political and professional roles, became more inclusive in terms of these factors.

6.3.IV – Political and social changes of the 20th century led to changes in the arts and literature. In the second half of the century, popular and consumer culture became more global. (Reggae, Bollywood, World Cup, the Olympics)

Complicating the Narrative
Confront Genocide (USHMM): https://www.ushmm.org/confront-genocide

Facing History and Ourselves: https://www.facinghistory.org/ 

Document in Focus
https://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/162-general/27901-the-way-ahead.html
(Excerpt from Globalization and its Discontents)

Recommendations
https://fiveable.me/live/ap-world/

Greenpeace unveils protest poster during a Real Madrid press conference prior to a Champions League match.
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/football/video/2013/dec/10/greenepeace-gazprom-real-madrid-champions-league-video

Episode 32 – Decolonization

A lengthy list of KCs for this episode:

6.1.I.B – The Green Revolution and commercial agriculture increased productivity and sustained the earth’s growing population as it spread chemically and genetically modified forms of agriculture.

6.2.I.C – After the end of World War II, some colonies negotiated their independence, while other colonies achieved independence through armed struggle. (India from the British Empire, The Gold Coast from the British Empire, Algeria from the French Empire, Kenya from the British Empire)

6.2.II.A – Nationalist leaders and parties in Asia and Afrrica sought varying degrees of autonomy within or independence from imperial rule. (Indian National Congress, Kwame Nkrumah in British Gold Coast (Ghana)

6.2.II.B – Regional, religious, and ethnic movements challenged both colonial rule and inherited imperial boundaries. (The Muslim League in British India)

6.2.II.C – Transnational movements sought to unite people across national boundaries. (Communism, Pan-Arabism, Pan-Africanism)

6.2.II.E – In many parts of the world, religious movements sought to redefine the relationship between the individual and the state. (Iranian Revolution of 1979)

6.2.III.A – The redrawing of old colonial boundaries led to conflict as well as population displacement and/or resettlements, such as the partitioning of India and Pakistan and population displacements following the creation of the state of Israel.

6.2.III.B – The migration of former colonial subjects to imperial metropoles (the former colonizing country, usually in the major cities) maintained cultural and economic ties between the colony and the metropole even after the dissolution of empires. (South Asians to Britain, Algerians to France)

6.2.V.A – Groups and individuals challenged the many wars of the century, and some, such as Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, promoted the practice of nonviolence as a way to bring about political change.

6.2.V.B – Groups and individuals, including the Non-Aligned Movement, opposed and promoted alternatives to the existing economic, political, and social orders. (The Anti-Apartheid Movement in South Africa, The Tiananmen Square protestors that promoted democracy in China)

6.2.V.C – Militaries and militarized states often responded to the proliferation of conflicts in ways that further intensified conflict. (Military dictatorship in Chile, the buildup of the military-industrial complex and weapons trading [Iran-Contra])

6.3.I.A – In communist states, such as the Soviet Union and China, governments controlled their national economies, often through repressive policies and with negative repercussions for their populations. (The Great Leap Forward)

6.3.I.D – In a trend accelerated by the end of the Cold War, many governments encouraged free-market economic policies and promoted economic liberalization in the late 20th century. (China under Deng Xiaoping, Chile under Pinochet)

6.3.III – People conceptualized society and culture in new ways; rights-based discourses challenged old assumptions about race, class, gender, and religion. In much of the world, access to education as well as participation in new political and professional roles, became more inclusive in terms of these factors. (Challenges to assumptions – UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Liberation Theology in Latin America) (Increased access – The end of apartheid, Caste and reservation in the Indian Constitution of 1950)

Complicating the Narrative:
https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-01-20/how-martin-luther-kings-dream-was-shaped-cold-war

Document in Focus
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5139/

Recommendations:
https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510333/throughline


Source: https://i.redd.it/b1oez1hebsa01.jpg
“African people will curb the colonizers” (Soviet propaganda)

 

Episode 31 – World War II and the Cold War

Presenting to you the Key Concepts for WWII and the Cold War…

6.1.III.C – New military technology and new tactics and the waging of “total war” led to increased levels of wartime casualties.

6.2.III.C – The rise of extremist groups in power led to the annihilation of specific populations, notably in the Holocaust doing World War II, and to other atrocities, acts of genocide, or ethnic violence.

6.2.IV.A – World War I and World War II were the first total wars. Governments used a variety of strategies, including political propaganda, art, media, and intensified forms of nationalism, to mobilize populations (both in the home countries and the colonies or former colonies) for the purpose of waging war. Governments used ideologies, including fascism and communism, to mobilize all of their state’s resources for war and, in the case of totalitarian states, to direct many aspects of daily life during the course of the conflicts and beyond.

6.2.IV.B – The sources of global conflict in the first half of the century varied and included imperialist expansion by European powers and Japan, competition for resources, the economic crisis engendered by the Great Depression, and the rise of fascist and totalitarian regimes to positions of power.

6.2.IV.C – The global balance of economic and political power shifted after the end of World War II and rapidly evolved into the Cold War. The democracy of the United States and the communist Soviet Union emerged as superpowers, which led to ideological conflict and a power struggle between capitalism and communism across the globe. This conflict extended beyond its basic ideological origins to have profound effects on economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of global events.

6.2.IV.D – The Cold War produced new military alliances, including NATO and the Warsaw Pact, and promoted proxy wars between and within postcolonial states in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.

6.3.II.A – New international organizations formed to maintain world peace and to facilitate international cooperation. (The United Nations)

Complicating the Narrative
BBC News Magazine article:
https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-21226068 

Stanford History Education Group Lesson on the Rape of Nanjing:
https://sheg.stanford.edu/history-lessons/invasion-nanking

Recommendations:
“World War II – summary of the deadliest conflict in history”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUXIuYHFgBE

“The Fallen of WWII”
http://www.fallen.io/ww2/ 


American troops approaching Omaha Beach, during the invasion of Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#/media/File:Approaching_Omaha.jpg

Episode 30 – The Interwar Years

Probably not as many KCs as you expected…

6.1.I.A – New modes of communication – including the Internet, radio communication, and cellular communication – and transportation reduced the problem of geographic distance.

6.2.I.B – Between the two world wars, European imperial states often maintained control over their colonies and in some cases gained additional territories.

6.2.II.A – Nationalist leaders and parties in Asia and Africa sought varying degrees of autonomy within or independence from imperial rule. (Indian National Congress)

6.2.II.D – The Mexican Revolution arose in opposition to neocolonialism and economic imperialism, and movements to redistribute land and resources developed within states in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, sometimes advocating communism or socialism.

6.2.V.A – Groups and individuals challenged the many wars of the century, and some, such as Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, promoted the practice of nonviolence as a way to bring about political change.

6.3.I.A – In communist states, such as the Soviet Union and China, governments controlled their national economies, often through repressive policies and with negative repercussions for their populations. (The Five Year Plans)

6.3.I.B – Following World War I and the onset of the Great Depression, governments began to take a more active role in economic life. (The New Deal, the fascist corporatist economy, populist governments of Brazil and Mexico)

Document in Focus:

Imperialism by Diego Rivera
Source: @ERBeckman on Twitter https://twitter.com/ERBeckman/status/1093185293140873220 

Recommmendations
Guernica by Pablo Picasso
Source: https://www.museoreinasofia.es/en/collection/artwork/guernica

BBC Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_VSixma864

Episode 29 – World War I

The Key Concepts in this episode are a bit less than you are used to seeing:

6.1.III.A – Diseases associated with poverty persisted, while other diseases emerged as new epidemics and threats to human survival. In addition, increased longevity led to a higher incidence of certain diseases. (The 1918 influenza pandemic)

6.1.III.C – New military technology and new tactics and the waging of “total war” led to increased levels of wartime casualties.

6.2.I.A – The older, land-based Ottoman, Russian, and Qing empires collapsed due to a combination of internal and external factors.

6.2.III.C – The rise of extremist groups in power led to the annihilation of specific populations, notably in the Holocaust during World War II, and to other atrocities, acts of genocide, or ethnic violence. (Armenians in Turkey during and after World War I)

6.2.IV.A – World War I and World War II were the first total wars. Governments used a variety of strategies, including propaganda, art, media, and intensified forms of nationalism, to mobilize populations (both in the home countries and the colonies or former colonies) for the purpose of waging war. Governments used ideologies, including fascism and communism, to mobilize all of their state’s resources for war and, in the case of totalitarian states, to direct many aspects of daily life during the course of the conflicts and beyond.

6.2.IV.B – The sources of global conflict in the first half of the century varied and included imperialist expansion by European powers and Japan, competition for resources, the economic crisis engendered by the Great Depression, and the rise of fascist and totalitarian regimes to positions of power.

6.3.II.A – New international organizations formed to maintain world peace and to facilitate international cooperation. (The League of Nations)

Complicating the Narrative
The Wilsonian Moment by Erez Manela
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-wilsonian-moment-9780195176155?cc=us&lang=en&

Document in Focus
Source: Lutiant van Wert, Native American female volunteer office worker, letter to a friend at an Indian school in Kansas, Washington, D.C., 1918.

Katherine and I just returned last Sunday evening from Camp Humphreys “Somewhere in Virginia” where we helped nurse soldiers sick with the Influenza. We were there at the camp for ten days among some of the very worst cases and yet we did not contract it. We had intended staying much longer than we did, but the work was entirely too hard for us. We worked from seven in the morning until seven at night with only a short time for luncheon and dinner. Our chief duties were to give medicines to the patients, take temperatures, fix ice packs, feed them at “eating time,” rub their back or chest with camphorated sweet oil, make egg-noggs, and a whole string of other things that I can’t

begin to name. Male orderlies carried the dead soldiers out on stretchers at the rate of two every three hours.

Repeated calls come from the Red Cross to do volunteer work right here in D.C. I volunteered again, but as yet I have not been called and am waiting. They are certainly desperate for nurses—even me can volunteer as a nurse in a camp or in Washington.

All the schools, churches, theaters, dancing halls, etc. are closed here also. There is a bill today in the Senate authorizing all the wartime government workers to stay home for the duration of the epidemic. It has not passed the House of Representatives yet, but I can’t help but hope it does.

Recommendations
Hardcore History: Blueprint for Armageddon
They Shall Not Grow Old – movie trailer

@IWM ART 1460Gassed by John Singer Sargent, 1919
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/23722

Episode 28 – The Ottomans, China, Japan, and Russia and Confront Modern Era

Here are your last Key Concepts of Period 5:

5.1.I.D – As the new methods of industrial production became more common in parts of northwestern Europe, they spread to other parts of Europe and the United States, Russia, and Japan.

5.1.II.C – The global economy of the 19th century expanded dramatically from the previous period due to increased exchanges of raw materials and finished goods in most parts of the world. Trade in some commodities was organized in a way that gave merchants and companies based in Europe and the US a distinct economic advantage. (Opium produced in the Middle East or South Asia and exported to China, Cotton grown in South Asia, Egypt, the Caribbean, or North America and exported to Great Britain and other European countries)

5.1.V.B – In response to the expansion of industrializing states, some government in Asia and Africa, such as the Ottoman Empire and Qing China, sought to reform and modernize their economies and militaries. Reform efforts were often resisted by some members of government or established elite groups.

5.1.V.C – In a small number of states, governments promoted their own state-sponsored visions of industrialization. (The economic reforms of Meiji Japan, the development of factories and railroads in Tsarist Russia, Muhammad Ali’s development of a cotton textile industry in Egypt)

5.2.I.E – Industrialized states practices neocolonialism in Latin America and economic imperialism in some parts of the world. (Britain and France expanding their influence in China through the Opium Wars)

5.2.II.A – The expansion of US and European influence over Tokugawa Japan led to the emergence of Meiji Japan.

5.2.II.B – The United States, Russia, and Japan expanded their land borders by conquering and settling neighboring territories.

5.3.III.A – Subjects challenge centralized imperial governments. (The challenge of the Taipings to the Manchus of the Qing Dynasty)

5.3.III.D – Increasing questions about political authority and growing nationalism contributed to anticolonial movements. (The Boxer Rebellion in Qing China)

5.3.III.E – Some of the rebellions were influence by diverse religious ideas. (Taiping Rebellion in China)

5.4.1.B – Because of the nature of new modes of transportation, both internal and external migrants increasingly relocated to cities. This pattern contributed to the significant global urbanization of the 19th century. The new methods of transportation also allowed for many migrants to return, periodically or permanently, to their home societies. (Japanese agricultural workers in the Pacific)

5.4.II.B – The new global capitalist economy continued to rely on coerced and semicoerced labor migration, including slavery, Chinese and Indian indentured servitude, and convict labor.

5.4.III.B – Migrants often created ethnic enclaves in different parts of the world that helped transplant their culture into new environments and facilitated the development of migrant support networks. (Chinese in Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, South America, and North America)

5.4.III.C – Receiving societies did not always embrace immigrants, as seen in the various degrees of ethnic and racial prejudice and the ways states attempted to regulate the increased flow of people across their borders. (The Chinese Exclusion Act)

Resources from “Complicating the Narrative”

https://lebanesestudies.news.chass.ncsu.edu/2017/11/15/why-did-they-leave-reasons-for-early-lebanese-migration/ 

https://reimaginingmigration.org/pogroms-and-russian-jewish-immigrants/

https://www.lehigh.edu/~ineng/VirtualAmericana/chineseimmigrationact.html

http://encyclopedia.densho.org/Immigration/

Document in Focus

https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/18797/1/Kwok_Dwight_TW_200911_MA_thesis.pdf

This comes from a Master’s Thesis written by Dwight Tat Wai Kwok at the University of Toronto. The translated text is in the thesis.

Recommendations

https://artsandculture.google.com/


Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukiyo-e#/media/File:Kiyochika_(1904)_Nichiro_Jinsenk-o_kaisen_dai_Nihon_kaigundaishōri_Banzai.jpg
Russo-Japanese Naval Battle at the Entrance of Incheon: The Great Victory of the Japanese Navy—Banzai! Kiyochika, 1904

Episode 27 – The Age of Imperialism

This episode tackles the following Key Concepts:

5.1.II.A – The need for raw materials for the factories and increased food supplies for the growing population in urban centers led to the growth of export economies around the world that specialized in commercial extraction of natural resources and the production of food and industrial crops. The profits from these raw materials were used to purchase finished goods.

5.1.II.B – The rapid development of steam-powered industrial production in European countries and the US contributed to the increase in these regions’ share of global manufacturing during the first Industrial Revolution. While Middle Eastern and Asian countries continued to produce manufactured goods, these regions’ share in global manufacturing declined.

5.1.II.C – The global economy of the 19th century expanded dramatically from the previous period due to increased exchanges of raw materials and finished goods in most parts of the world. Trade in some commodities was organized in a way that gave merchants and companies based in Europe and the US a distinct economic advantage.

5.2.I.A – States with existing colonies strengthened their control over those colonies.

5.2.I.B – European states, as well as the United States and Japan, established empires throughout Asia and the Pacific, while Spanish and Portuguese influence declined.

5.2.I.C – Many European states used both warfare and diplomacy to expand their empires in Africa.

5.2.I.D – In some parts of their empires, Europeans established settler colonies.

5.2.I.E – Industrialized states practiced neocolonialism in Latin America and economic imperialism in some parts of the world.

5.2.II.B – The United States, Russia, and Japan expanded their land borders by conquering and settling neighboring territories.

5.2.II.C – Anti-imperial resistance took various forms, including direct resistance within empires and the creation of new states on the peripheries.

5.3.III.D – Increasing questions about political authority and growing nationalism contributed to anticolonial movements.

5.3.III.E – Some of the rebellions were influenced by diverse religious ideas.

Complicating the Narrative

The Trouble with Empire by Antoinette Burton
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-trouble-with-empire-9780199936601?cc=us&lang=en&

Document(s) in Focus

“The White Man’s Burden” by Rudyard Kipling
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5478/

“The Black Man’s Burden” by Lulu Baxter Guy
https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/749

Recommendation

White King, Red Rubber, Black Death
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vh8B1xbOEIA


“In The Rubber Coils. Scene – The Congo ‘Free’ State” Linley Sambourne depicts King Leopold II of Belgium as a snake entangling a congolese rubber collector.
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Punch_congo_rubber_cartoon.jpg

Episode 26 – The Industrial Revolution

A laundry list of KCs in this episode:

5.1.I.A – A variety of factors that led to the rise of industrial production and eventually resulted in the Industrial Revolution included: Europe’s location on the Atlantic Ocean, the geographical distribution of coal, iron, and timber, European demographic changes, urbanization, improved agricultural productivity, legal protection of private property, an abundance of rivers and canals, access to foreign resources, and the accumulation of capital.

5.1.I.B – The development of machines, including steam engines and the internal combustion engine, made it possible to take advantage of vast new resources of energy stored is fossil fuels, specifically coal and oil. The fossil fuels revolution greatly increased the energy available to human societies.

5.1.I.C – The development of the factory system concentrated labor in a single location and led to an increasing degree of specialization of labor.

5.1.I.D – As the new methods of industrial production became more common in parts of northwestern Europe, they spread to other parts of Europe and the United States.

5.1.I.E – The “second industrial revolution” led to new methods in the production of steel, chemicals, electricity, and precision machinery during the second half of the 19th century.

5.1.II.A – The need for raw materials for the factories and increased food supplies for the growing population in urban centers led to the growth of export economies around the world that specialized in commercial extraction of natural resources and the production of food and industrial crops. The profits from these raw materials were used to purchase finished goods.

5.1.II.C – The global economy of the 19th century expanded dramatically from the previous period due to increased exchanges of raw materials and finished goods in most parts of the world. Trade in some commodities was organized in a way that gave merchants and companies based in Europe and the US a distinct economic advantage.

5.1.IV – There were major development and innovations in transportation and communication, including railroads, steamships, telegraphs, and canals.

5.1.V.A – In industrialized states, many workers organized themselves, often in labor unions, to improve working conditions, limit hours, and gain higher wages. Workers’ movements and political parties emerged in different areas, promoting alternative visions of society, including Marxism.

5.1.V.D – In response to the social and economic changes brought about by industrial capitalism, some governments promoted various types of political, social, educational, and urban reforms.

5.1.VI.A – New social classes, including the middle class and the industrial working class, developed.

5.1.VI.B – Family dynamics, gender roles, and demographics changed in response to industrialization.

5.1.VI.C – Rapid urbanization that accompanied global capitalism often led to a variety of challenges.

5.3.VI.B – Demands for women’s suffrage and an emergent feminism challenged political and gender hierarchies.

5.4.I.A – Changes in food production and improved medical conditions contributed to a significant global rise in population in both urban and rural areas.

5.4.I.B – Because of the nature of the new modes of transportation, both internal and external migrants increasingly relocated to cities. This pattern contributed to the significant global urbanization of the 19th century. The new methods of transportation also allowed for many migrants to return, periodically or permanently, to their home societies.

5.4.II.A – Many individuals chose freely to relocate, often in search of work.

Complicating the Narrative

Washington Post Article: “Why the Industrial Revolution didn’t happen in China”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/10/28/why-the-industrial-revolution-didnt-happen-in-china/?utm_term=.c2c723c017b2

BBC In Our Time: The Industrial Revolution
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wqdc7

Document in Focus

Engels’ The Condition of the Working-Class in England (excerpt is on page 16 of the .pdf file)
http://www.c3teachers.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/NewYork_10_Industrialization.pdf

File:Crystal Palace - interior.jpgThe Great Exhibition (a.k.a. the Cyrstal Palace Exhbition) of 1851 that took place in London
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Crystal_Palace_-_interior.jpg

Episode 25 – The Age of Revolutions

Here are the first Key Concepts of Period 5 addressed in the pod…

5.1.III.A – The ideological inspiration for economic changes lies in the development of capitalism and classical liberalism associated with Adam Smith and John Stuart Mill.

5.3.I.A – Enlightenment philosophies applied new ways of understanding and empiricist approaches to both the natural world and human relationships, encouraging observation and inference in all spheres of life; they also reexamined the role that religion played in public life, insisting on the importance of reason as opposed to revelation. Oher Enlightenment philosophies developed new political ideas about the individual, natural rights, and the social contract.

5.3.I.B – The ideas of Enlightenment philosophers, as reflected in revolutionary document – including the Declaration of Independence, French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, and Bolivar’s Jamaica Letter – influenced resistance to existing political authority, often in pursuit of independence and democratic ideals.

5.3.I.C – Enlightenment ideas influenced various reform movements that challenged existing notions of social relations, which contributed to the expansion of rights as seen in expanded suffrage, the abolition of slavery, and/or the end of serfdom.

5.3.II – Beginning in the 18th century, peoples around the world developed a new sense of commonality based on language, religion, social customs, and territory. These newly imagined national communities linked this identity with the borders of the state, while governments used this idea of nationalism to unite diverse populations. In some cases, nationalists challenged boundaries or sought unification of fragmented regions. (German and Italian nationalism)

5.3.III.B – American colonial subjects led a series of rebellions – including the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and the Latin American independence movements – that facilitated the emergence of independent states in the US, Haiti, and mainland Latin America.

5.3.III.C – Slave resistance challenged existing authorities in the Americas.

5.3.IV.A – Discontent with monarchist and imperial rule encouraged the development of various ideologies, including democracy, liberalism, socialism, and communism.

5.3.IV.B – Demands for women’s suffrage and an emergent feminism challenged political and gender hierarchies.

Complicating the Narrative: Sources

Davis, Chris. “Before They Were Haitians: Examining Evidence for Kongolese Influence on the Haitian Revolution.” Journal of Haitian Studies 22, no. 2 (2016): 4-36. http://www.jstor.org/stable/44478387.

Thornton, John K. “”I Am the Subject of the King of Congo”: African Political Ideology and the Haitian Revolution.” Journal of World History 4, no. 2 (1993): 181-214. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20078560.

Document in Focus

Olympe de Gouges “The Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen”
https://csivc.csi.cuny.edu/americanstudies/files/lavender/decwom2.html

Battle of Vertières in 1803
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_Revolution#/media/File:Haitian_Revolution.jpg

Episode 24 – East Asia and the Early Modern World

4.1.I.A – The intensification of trade brought prosperity and economic disruption to the merchants and governments in the trading region of the Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean, the Sahara, and overland Eurasia.

4.1.IV.A – European merchants’ role in Asian trade was characterized mostly by transporting goods from one Asian country to another market in Asia or the Indian Ocean region.

4.1.IV.B – Commercialization and the creation of a global economy were intimately connected to new global circulation of silver from the Americas.

4.1.V.B – American foods became staple crops in various parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Cash crops were grown primarily on plantations with coerced labor and were exported mostly to Europe and the Middle East in this period.

4.1.V.D – Populations in Afro-Eurasia benefited nutritionally from the increased diversity of American food crops.

4.I.VII – As merchants’ profits increased and governments collected more taxes, funding for the visual and performing arts, even for popular audiences, increased along with an expansion of literacy and increased focus on innovation and scientific inquiry.

4.2.III.A – Both imperial conquests and widening global economic opportunities contributed to the formation of new political and economic elites. (The Manchus in China)

4.2.III.B – The power of existing political and economic elites fluctuated as they confronted new challenges to their ability to affect the policies of the increasingly powerful monarchs and leaders. (The daimyo in Japan)

4.3.I.A – Rulers continued to use religious ideas, art, and monumental architecture to legitimize their rule. (Chinese emperors’ public performance of Confucian rituals, Qing imperial portraits)

4.3.II.B – Land empires – including the Manchu, Mughal, Ottoman, and Russian – expanded dramatically in size.

4.3.III – Competition over trade routes, state rivalries, and local resistance all provided significant challenges to state consolidation and expansion. (Samurai revolts)

The Qianlong Emperor as Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of Wisdom
Image Source: https://www.si.edu/object/fsg_F2000.4 

I found this resource super helpful for my research on Qing Era religion and its connection to the state:
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/cosmos/

Episode 23 – Early Modern Islamic Empires

This episode’s Key Concepts include:

4.1.IV – The increase in interactions between newly connected hemispheres and intensification of connections within hemispheres expanded the spread and reform of existing religions and contributed to both religious conflicts and the creation of syncretic belief systems and practices. (The intensification of Sunni-Shi’a split by the political rivalries between the Ottoman and the Safavid empires. The development of Sikhism in the context of interactions between Hinduism and Islam.)

4.1.VII – As merchants’ profits increased and governments collected more taxes, funding for the visual and performing arts, even for popular audiences, increased along with an expansion of literacy and increased focus on innovation and scientific inquiry.

4.2.III.B – The power of existing political and economic elites fluctuated as they confronted new challenges to their ability to affect the policies of the increasingly powerful monarchs and leaders. (The zamindars in the Mughal Empire)

4.3.I.A – Rulers continued to use religious ideas, art, and monumental architecture to legitimize their rule. (Safavid use of Shiism, Ottoman miniature painting, Mughal mausolea and mosques, such as the Taj Mahal)

4.3.I.B – Many states adopted practices to accommodate the different ethnic and religious diversity of their subjects or to utilize the economic, political, and military contributions of different ethnic or religious groups. (policies of Akbar in the Mughal Empire)

4.3.I.C – Recruitment and use of bureaucratic elites, as well as the development of military professionals, became more common among rulers who wanted to maintain centralized control over their populations and resources. (Ottoman devshirme)

Audrey Truschke’s article on Aurangzeb
https://aeon.co/essays/the-great-aurangzeb-is-everybodys-least-favourite-mughal

Ottoman Miniature of the Suleymaniye Mosque (circa 1580s)
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%BCleymaniye_Mosque#/media/File:Sueleymaniye_painting_by_Osman.jpg

Once again, check out Head on History!

Episode 22 – Africa and the Atlantic World

Here are the Key Concepts this episode tackles:

4.1.IV.D – The Atlantic system involved the movement of goods, wealth, and free and unfree laborers and the mixing of African, American, and European cultures and people.

4.1.V.B – American foods became staple crops in various parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Cash crops were grown primarily on plantations with coerced labor and were exported mostly to Europe and the Middle East in this period. (Maize and Manioc)

4.1.V.C – Afro-Eurasian fruit trees, grains, sugar, and domesticated animals were brought by Europeans to the Americas, while other foods were brought by African slaves. (Okra and rice)

4.1.V.D – Populations in Afro-Eurasia benefitted nutritionally from the increased diversity of American food crops.

4.1.VI – The increase in interactions between newly connected hemispheres and intensification of connections within hemispheres expanded the spread and reform of existing religions and contributed to both religious conflicts and the creation of syncretic belief systems and practices. (The development of Vodun and other syncretic religions in the Americas as a result of interactions between Christianity and African religions.)

4.2.II.B – Slavery in Africa continued both the traditional incorporation of mainly female slaves into households and the export of slaves to the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean.

4.2.II.C – Colonial economies in the Americas depended on a range of coerced labor. (Chattel slavery)

4.2.III.C – Some notable gender and family restructuring occurred, including demographic changes in Africa that resulted from the slave trades.

4.3.II.A – Europeans established new trading-post empires in Africa and Asia, which proved profitable for the rulers and merchants involved in new global  trade networks, but the impact of these empires was limited by the authority of local states including the Ashanti and Mughal empires.

Thanks to @paperlesshist for the resources, especially the fantastic maps! Give him a follow on Twitter.

Episode 21 – Integration of the Americas

Here are (all) of the Key Concepts this episode addresses:

4.1.IV.B – Commercialization and the creation of a global economy were intimately connected to new global circulation of silver from the Americas.

4.1.IV.C – Mercantilist policies and practices were used by European rulers to expand and control their economies and claim overseas territories, and joint-stock companies, influenced by these mercantilist principles, were used by rulers and merchants to finance exploration and compete against one another in global trade.

4.1.IV.D – The Atlantic system involved the movement of goods, wealth, and free and unfree laborers and the mixing of African, American, and European cultures and people.

4.1.V.A – European colonization of the Americas led to the spread of diseases – including smallpox, measles, and influenza – that were endemic in the Eastern Hemisphere among Amerindian populations and the unintentional transfer of disease vectors, including mosquitoes and rats.

4.1.V.E – European colonization and the introduction of European agriculture and settlements practices in the Americas often affected the physical environment through deforestation and soil depletion.

4.1.VI – The increase in interactions between newly connected hemispheres and the intensification of connections within hemispheres expanded the spread and reform of existing religions and contributed to both religious conflicts and the creation of syncretic belief systems and practices. (The development of Vodun and other syncretic religions in the Americas as a result of interactions between Christianity and African religions)

4.2.II.C – The growth of the plantation economy increased the demand for slaves in the Americas.

4.2.II.D – Colonial economies in the Americas depended on a range of coerced labor. (Chattel slavery, encomienda and hacienda systems, the Spanish adaptation of the Inca mit’a)

4.2.III.A – Both imperial conquests and widening global economic opportunities contributed to the formation of new political and economic elites. (Creole elites in Spanish America)

4.3.I.B – Many states adopted practices to accommodate the different ethnic and religious diversity of their subjects or to utilize the economic, political, and military contributions of different ethnic or religious groups. (Spanish creation of a separate Republica de Indios, Spanish and Portuguese creation of new racial classifications in the Americas, including mestizo, mulatto, and creole)

4.3.II.C – European states established new maritime empires in the Americas, including the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, French, and British.

4.3.III – Competition over trade routes, state rivalries, and local resistance all provided significant challenges to state consolidation and expansion. (Piracy in the Caribbean)


The Virgin of the Mountain of Potosi
Source: https://ianandsandie.files.wordpress.com

Virgin of Guadalupe. 16th century C.E. Oil and possibly tempera on maguey cactus cloth and cotton, Basilica of Guadalupe, Mexico City (photo: Esparta Palma, CC: BY 2.0)
The Virgin of Guadalupe on display in the Basilica of Guadalupe, Mexico City
Source: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/early-europe-and-colonial-americas/colonial-americas/a/virgin-of-guadalupe

15 Minute History Episode: https://15minutehistory.org/2016/04/13/episode-81-the-trans-pacific-silver-trade-and-early-modern-globalization/

Episode 20 – Early Modern Russia

Here are your Russian Key Concepts:

4.1.VII – As merchants’ profits increased and governments collected more taxes, funding for the visual and performing arts, even for popular audiences, increased along with an expansion of literacy and increased focus on innovation and scientific inquiry.

4.2.II.A – Peasant and artisan labor intensified in many regions.

4.2.III.B – The power of existing political and economic elites fluctuated as they confronted new challenges to their ability to affect the policies of the increasingly powerful monarchs and leaders. (The boyars/nobility of Russia)

4.3.I.A – Rulers continued to use religious ideas, art, and monumental architecture to legitimize their rule. (European palaces, such as Peterhof)

4.3.I.D – Rulers used tribute collection and tax farming to generate revenue for territorial expansion.

4.3.II.B – Land empires – including the Manchu, Mughal, Ottoman, and Russian – expanded dramatically in size.

4.3.III – Competition over trade routes, state rivalries, and local resistance all provided significant challenges to state consolidation and expansion. (Local resistance – Peasant uprisings [Pugachev’s rebellion])

ivan
Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan
Source: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/man-attacks-ivan-terrible-painting-blames-vodka-180969198/

Russia: Land of the Tsars Video Clips:

Part I: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtlRJSmSm_Y&list=PLY8duwCEfNUOfCAIf_MIfyJgJ7TFnm3lb

Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzhzFgbGL04&index=2&list=PLY8duwCEfNUOfCAIf_MIfyJgJ7TFnm3lb

Episode 19 – The Transformation of Western Europe

Here are the Key Concepts covered in this episode:

4.1.IV.B – Commercialization and the creation of a global economy were intimately connected to new global circulation of silver from the Americas.

4.1.IV.C – Mercantilist policies and practices were used by European rulers to expand and control their economies and claim overseas territories, and join-stock companies, influenced by these mercantilist principles, were used by ruler and merchants to finance exploration and compete against one another in global trade.

4.1.VI – The increase in interactions between newly connected hemispheres and intensification of connections within hemispheres expanded the spread and reform of existing religions and contributed to both religious conflicts and the creation of syncretic belief systems and practices. (The role of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in spreading Christianity outside of Europe.)

4.1.VII – As merchants’ profits increased and governments collected more taxes, funding for the visual and performing arts, even for popular audiences, increased along with an expansion of literacy and increased focus on innovation and scientific inquiry. (Renaissance and Scientific Revolution)

4.3.I.A – Rulers continued to use religious ideas, art, and monumental architecture to legitimize their rule. (European notions of divine right) (Absolutism and Reformation)

4.3.III – Competition over state rivalries provided significant challenges to state consolidation and expansion. (Thirty Years’ War)


The School of Athens by Raphael
Source: Wikipedia

Smarthistory. art, history, conversation. – YouTube Links

The Ambassadors

The School of Athens

Four Apostles

Charles I at the Hunt

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp

The Arnolfini Portrait

Episode 18 – Transoceanic Connections

Key Concepts addressed in this episode:

4.1.I.A – The intensification of trade brought prosperity and economic disruption to the merchants and governments in the trading region of the Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean, the Sahara, and overland Eurasia.

4.1.II.A – The developments included the production of new tools, innovations in ship designs, and an improved understanding of global wind and currents patterns – all of which made transoceanic travel and trade possible. (Caravels)

4.1.III.A – Portuguese development of maritime technology and navigational skills led to increased travel to and trade with West Africa and resulted in the construction of a global trading-post empire.

4.1.III.B – Spanish sponsorship of the first Columbian and subsequent voyages across the Atlantic and Pacific dramatically increased European interest in transoceanic travel and trade.

4.1.III.C – Northern Atlantic crossings for fishing and for the purpose of settlement continued and spurred European searches for multiple routes to Asia.

4.1.IV.A – European merchants’ role in Asian trade was characterized mostly by transporting goods from one Asian country to another market in Asia or the Indian Ocean region.

4.1.IV.B – Commercialization and the creation of a global economy were intimately connected to new global circulation of silver from the Americas.

4.1.IV.C – Mercantilism policies and practices were used by European rulers to expand and control their economies and claim overseas territories, and joint-stock companies, influenced by these mercantilist principles, were used by rulers and merchants to finance exploration and compete against one another in global trade.

4.1.IV.D – The Atlantic system involved the movement of goods, wealth, and free and unfree laborers and the mixing of African, American, and European cultures and people.

4.1.V.A – European colonization of the Americas led to the spread of diseases – including smallpox, measles, and influenza – that were endemic in the Eastern Hemisphere among Amerindian populations and the unintentional transfer of disease vectors, including mosquitoes and rats.

4.1.V.B – American foods became staple crops in various parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Cash crops were grown primarily on plantations with coerced labor and were exported mostly to Europe and the Middle East in this period. (potatoes, maize, manioc, sugar, tobacco)

4.1.V.C – Afro-Eurasian fruit tree, grains, sugar, and domesticated animals were brought by Europeans to the Americas, while other foods were brought by African slaves. (horses, pigs, cattle, okra, rice)

4.1.V.D – Populations in Afro-Eurasia benefitted nutritionally from the increased diversity of American food crops.

4.1.V.E – European colonization and the introduction of European agriculture and settlements practices in the Americas often affected the physical environment through deforestation and soil depletion.

4.2.II.C – The growth of the plantation economy increased the demand for slaves in the Americas.

4.2.III.D – Colonial economies in the Americas depended on a range of coerced labor. (chattel slavery, indentured servitude, encomienda and hacienda systems, mit’a)

4.3.II.A – Europeans established new trading-post empires in Africa and Asia, which proved profitable for the rulers and merchants involved in new global trade networks, but the impact of these empires was limited by the authority of local states including the Ashanti and Mughal empires.

4.3.II.C – European states established new maritime empires in the Americas, including the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, French, and British.

Lynda Shaffer’s “Southernization”
https://roosevelt.ucsd.edu/_files/mmw/mmw12/SouthernizationArgumentAnalysis2014.pdf

Image Source: http://worldhistoryeducatorsblog.blogspot.com/

Episode 17 – Expanding Global Contacts

The Key Concepts for this episode are listed below:

3.1.II.B – Some migrations had a significant environmental impact, including the maritime migrations of the Polynesian peoples who cultivated transplanted foods and domesticated animals as they moved to new islands.

3.2.II.A – Technological and cultural transfers were taking place during Chinese maritime activity led by Ming Admiral Zheng He.

3.3.I.B – Demand for luxury goods increased in Afro-Eurasia. Chinese, Persian, and Indian artisans and merchants expanded their production of textiles and porcelains for export; industrial production of iron and steel expanded in China.

3.3.II.A – Multiple factors contributed to the decline of urban areas in this period, including invasions, disease, and the decline of agricultural productivity.

3.3.II.B – Multiple factors contributed to urban revival, including the end of invasions, the availability of safe and reliable transport, the rise of commerce and warmer temperatures between 800 CE and 1300, increased agricultural productivity and subsequent rising population, and greater availability of labor.

Article from The Atlantic on the old (beginning at 1450) proposition to change AP World:
https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/06/ap-world-history-controversy/562778/

Image source: http://www.alrahalah.com/2010/09/zheng-he/

Episode 16 – The Mongols

Key Concepts discussed in this episode (specifics mentioned in parentheses)

3.1.I.E – The expansion of empires – including the Mongols – facilitated Afro-Eurasian trade and communication as new people were drawn into their conquerors’ economies and trade networks.

3.1.II.A – The expansion and intensification of long-distance trade routes often depended on environmental knowledge and technological adaptations to the environment (The way Central Asian pastoral groups used horses to travel in the steppes)

3.2.I.B – In some places, new political entities emerged, including the Mongol Khanates

3.2.II.A – Technological and cultural transfers were taking place (across the Mongol empire [spread of Islamic scientific knowledge to Mongol China])

3.3.II.A – Multiple factors contributed to the decline of urban areas in this period, including invasions, disease, and the decline of agricultural productivity.

3.3.III.A – The diversification of labor organization that began with settled agriculture continued in this period. Forms of labor organization included nomadic pastoralism.

3.3.III.B – As in the previous period, social structures were shaped largely by class and caste hierarchies. Patriarchy continued; however, in some areas, women exercised more power and influence, notably among the Mongols.

BBC History Extra article: “The brutal brilliance of Genghis Khan”
https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/the-brutal-brilliance-of-genghis-khan/

Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History: “The Wrath of the Khans”
https://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-wrath-of-the-khans-series/ 

Crash Course World History: “Wait for it…The Mongols!”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szxPar0BcMo&t=533s

“Coronation of Ogedei Khan” by Rashid al-Din
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_Empire#/media/File:CoronationOfOgodei1229.jpg

 

Episode 15 – The Sinification of Japan, Korea, and China

Key Concepts Discussed

3.1.I.E – The expansion of empires – including China – facilitated Afro-Eurasian trade and communication as new people were drawn into their conquerors’ economies and trade networks. (Korea and Japan especially, though Japan wasn’t conquered)

3.1.III.B – In key places along important trade routes, merchants set up diasporic communities where they introduced their own cultural traditions into the indigenous culture. (Chinese merchant communities in Southeast Asia)

3.1.III.D – Increased cross-cultural interactions resulted in the diffusion of literary, artistic, and cultural traditions, as well as scientific and technological innovations. (The influence of Neoconfucianism and Buddhism in East Asia)

3.2.I.C – Some states synthesized local with foreign traditions (Chinese traditions that influence states in Japan)

3.3.III.B – As in the previous period, social structures were shaped largely by class and caste hierarchies. Patriarchy continued; however, in some areas, women exercised more power and influence, most notably in Japan and Southeast Asia. (Vietnamese women’s rights remain holdouts against Confucianism)

3.3.III.D – Buddhism and Neoconfucianism were adopted in new regions and often caused significant changes in gender relations and family structure. (Reshaping of gender roles as Confucianism grew in Vietnam)

Angkor Wat Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gskysDR7BYw

Thesis:  Although Japanese and Vietnamese cultures initially embraced features of Confucian culture, they all faced their own unique obstacles preventing the full application of a Chinese political system.

  1. BODY 1 – Similar features adopted by both the Japanese and Vietnamese
  2. BODY 2 – Obstacles preventing the Japanese from full adoption
  3. BODY 3 – Obstacles preventing the Vietnamese from full adoption

Think of potential evidence for each of these paragraphs!

Genpei kassen.jpg
Scene from the Gempei War in which the Minamoto family established themselves as the ruling family of Japan. (Source: Wikipedia)

Episode 14 – The Golden Age of China

Key Concepts discussed in the episode (specifics in parentheses):

3.1.I.C – The growth of interregional trade in luxury goods was encouraged by significant innovations in previously existing transportation and commercial technologies-including the caravanserai, compass use, the astrolabe, and larger ship designs in sea travel-and new forms of credit and the development of money economies.

3.1.I.D – Commercial growth was also facilitated by state-sponsored commercial infrastructures such as the Grand Canal in China.

3.1.III.C – As exchange networks intensified, an increased number of travelers within Afro-Eurasia wrote about their travels (Xuanzang)

3.1.III.D – Increased cross-cultural interactions resulted in the diffusion of literary, artistic and cultural traditions, as well as scientific and technological innovations. (The influence of Neoconfucianism and Buddhism in East Asia)

3.1.IV – There was continued diffusion of crops and pathogens, including epidemic diseases like the bubonic plague, along trade routes. (New rice varieties in East Asia)

3.2.1.A – Following the collapses of empires, imperial states were reconstituted in some regions, including the Chinese dynasties (Sui, Tang, and Song), combining traditional sources of power and legitimacy with innovations better suited to their specific local context.

3.2.II.A – Technological and cultural transfers were taking place between Tang China and the Abbasids

3.3.I.B – Demand for luxury goods increased in Afro-Eurasia. Chinese artisans and merchants expanded their production of textiles and porcelains for export; industrial productions of iron and steel expanded in China.

3.3.II.B – Multiple factors contributed to urban revival, including the end of invasions, the availability of safe and reliable transport, the rise of commerce and warmer temperatures between 800 CE and 1300, increased agricultural productivity and subsequent rising population, and greater availability of labor. (Chang’an, Kaifeng, Hangzhou)

3.3.III.C – Peasants resisted attempts to raise dues and taxes by staging revolts. (Song tax revolts)

3.3.III.D – Buddhism and Neo-Confucianism were adopted in new regions and often caused significant changes in gender relations and family structure. (The practice of foot binding in Song China)

Footbinding Chicago news story:
https://wgntv.com/2018/02/07/survivor-of-ancient-chinese-practice-of-foot-binding-shares-her-story/

Along the River During the Qingming Festival:
http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/song-scroll/song.html

The Story of China – Episode 3:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dT6TwsMtTRY

Episode 13 – The Pre-Columbian Americas

We’ll be checking out the Aztecs and the Incas primarily in today’s episode, making as many comparisons between the two groups as we can while also tracing the roots of their histories in Central America and South America, respectively. I made a good bit of recommendations (in between my rantings, ramblings, and potential mispronunciations) throughout the video and have posted the relevant links below!

Forgive the poor editing on the intro! I’m not going back to fix it (so sleepy).

Mesoamerican Ballgame: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKvQjgC9sIY 

Quipu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmPyz1kCbOw

Aztec, Inca, and Maya Sutori Timeline: https://www.sutori.com/story/aztec-inca-maya

*Disclaimer: Guessing “what time it is” does not indicate the score you will receive on your AP World History exam. Sorry if this disappointed you. You should check out @doggosdoingthings on Instagram to cheer yourself up.

Episode 12 – Europe during the “Middle Ages”

This episode tackles the notion that this time period should be defined by as simplistic a term as “Middle.” We’ll discuss the political, economic, environmental, and cultural changes and continuities (see what I did there?!) during this period.

Here’s the video I rambled about!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFcF_qfLHeQ

Episode 11 – The Byzantine Empire

Today we talk Justinian, Byzantine foreign relations, political features, culture, differences in religion with western Europe, and the spread of Byzantine influences throughout eastern Europe. We even throw some love to the famous Nika Riots and give Theodora (some of) the credit she is due!

This is my first episode I’ve recorded in a few weeks, so hopefully I wasn’t too rusty! Also, this is probably the best episode ever because my daughter makes her first, albeit short,  appearance!

Episode 10 – Post-Classical Africa

Digging into the worlds of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai then moving on to the Swahili Coast! We’ll be looking at the spread of Islam throughout these two regions, interactions between cultures at these two points of contact, goods exchanged, as well as some of the technology and natural process helping to facilitate these interactions. Keep listening to learn about one of the most significant world travelers of all, Ibn Battuta. Note: I am daring to omit a good bit of information on several regions in Africa; such is the life of a World History teacher… Enjoy!

Catalan Atlas (1375) featuring your boy, Mansa Musa (on the second panel from the left, lower portion):

Click here for a high resolution image of the Catalan Atlas

http://www.cresquesproject.net/catalan-atlas-legends

ORIAS (for information on Ibn Battuta): https://orias.berkeley.edu/resources-teachers/travels-ibn-battuta

Episode 9 – Islam is Growing and Growing and…

Another one in the books! This time I focus on the decline of the Abbasids, the spread of Islam to South and Southeast Asia, the cultural and technological transfers brought on as a result of Islam, and the declining status of women in the caliphate.

Article from “The Explainer”
https://www.historytoday.com/jonathan-harris/byzantium-and-abbasids-best-enemies

Recommendations (LISTEN TO HEAD ON HISTORY)
https://player.fm/series/head-on-history

Episode 8 – The Rise and Spread of Islam

Tackling the foundations, some social characteristics, and the very basics of the Umayyads and Abbasids. Be sure to check out my recommendation in this episode for lots more info about Islam!

The podcast is now available on iTunes AND Stitcher! Links below.

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/world-history-class-with-mr-lutz/id1418821133?mt=2

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/mike-lutz/world-history-class-with-mr-lutz

The primary document I sourced in “The Explainer”
Doc

Recommendation:
512

Subscribe to “Heads on History” on iTunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/head-on-history/id1244299309?mt=2

Episode 7 – Classical World Overview

Wrapping up Period 2! Let’s do this!

The Silk Roads: A New History of the World
https://www.amazon.com/Silk-Roads-New-History-World/dp/1101912375

AP World History reviews from Think Fiveable (formerly High Level History)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxnnTFTsVttnVo190h_-wZw/playlists?view=50&shelf_id=2&sort=dd

More info about Fiveable here: https://courses.fiveable.me/

Episode 6 – Classical Greece and Rome

How did I manage to fit all of Greece and Rome’s history into an episode just over 30 minutes long. I didn’t, not even close. However, I gave it a shot and here it is. Lots more to say about trade and the role of religion, but this episode tries to establish broad historical patterns by focusing on the political trajectory of the two civilizations.

For more on the Mary Beard controversy (so much respect for her, not ashamed to show my bias):
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/06/mary-beard-twitter-abuse-roman-britain-ethnic-diversity
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/aug/09/if-africans-were-in-roman-britain-why-dont-we-see-their-dna-today-mary-beard

Subscribe to “The History of Rome” podcast by Mike Duncan:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-history-of-rome/id261654474?mt=2

Episode 5 – Classical India

This episode tackles some of the historical foundations and beliefs of Hinduism and Buddhism while also addressing some of the political foundations of the Maurya and Gupta Empires. Stay tuned for today’s version of “The Explainer” to learn about the delicious pasta dish known as Cacio e Pepe. Further history of the dish and the recipe (go on and make it, just be sure to share with me if it’s good!) are posted below.

History of Cacio e Pepe
https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/203738/lidia-bastianich-takes-us-through-the-history-of-cacio-e-pepe/

Cacio e Pepe Recipe
http://philosokitchen.com/cacio-e-pepe-recipe-and-legend/

Episode 4 – The Unification of China

In this episode I cover the beliefs and values of Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism. You’ll also get the gist of the Qin and Han Dynasties! Get ready for the hit song of the summer, coming towards the end of the episode…

“A Revolutionary Discovery in China” from The New York Review of Books
https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/04/21/revolutionary-discovery-in-china/

The Chinese Dynasty Song
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFyeLvEfZEA

Episode 2 – Before History

I finally got over my recording anxiety and laid down the track! It’s safe to say I’m pleased with this as my first go-round. Please feel free to let me know your thoughts because this is ultimately for students. I hope you find this to be useful!

Take care, everyone.

– Mr. Lutz

Podcast music:
Intro and outro: “Autumn” by Question?
Segment transitions: “Conte” by Question?
http://www.melloworange.com/qstn/
Permissions granted courtesy of Mellow Orange.

Episode 1 – Intro to the Pod

Here it is! The first episode has arrived. In the five minutes or so of my chatting I explain the rationale behind developing this podcast and the different segments I plan on including for each episode.

Nothing content related yet, this is just to set up the basics! Those listeners who are not my students should know this podcast will most directly correlate with Peter Stearns’ World Civilizations, 5th edition. However, I plan to include lots of outside information that will only elevate the relevance of the textbook.

Thanks for checking this out! I’m looking forward to getting fully underway.

Podcast music:
“Autumn” by Question?
http://www.melloworange.com/qstn/
Permissions granted courtesy of Mellow Orange.

Podcast Picture (1)

Stay Tuned…

What’s going on, everybody? This is where you will find new podcast episodes as they begin to roll out in the next week or so.

I have a lot to learn about podcasting and building a site on WordPress, so bear with me as I navigate these very unfamiliar waters!

For now, stay true to yourself and enjoy the ride! Talk to you soon.

American Colony. Photo Dept, photographer. “And there was a great calm.” Sailing boat at sunrise., None. [Between 1934 and 1939] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/mpc2010001845/PP/.